Indian brides & Their Unique Jewellery



Jan 22 2019     By Asha Parvathy


Indian Bridal Jewellery

 

Jewellery is an essential part of Indian bridal trousseau. They add the charm to your glamorous look. The bridal look is incomplete without the bridal jewellery, even if it is minimal.


India which is known for its diverse culture also has unique signature jewellery collections for each region. But nowadays Indian brides love to experiment; as a result, you could see a North Indian bride wear traditional South Indian temple jewellery pieces and the South Indian bride wears the famed kundhan jewellery. You could attribute it to the influence of movies and fashion magazines.


Here we give you a sneak peek into the famous wedding jewellery of each Indian states.


Andhra Pradesh/Telangana

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

The state is famous for temple jewellery and the fresh water pearls, so most of these designs could also include divine themes which are combined with pearls and precious stones. Paizeb is a traditional bronze anklet from the state. Important jewellery from the Nizam era is the satlada. To know more about satlada click here.


 

Assam

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states
 

This North Eastern state has a rich culture and unexplored terrains. The bridal jewellery of the state is influenced by its close proximity to tribal population and culture. The traditional bridal ornaments of the state are thuriya, muthi- kharu, doog-dogloka- paro, kerumoni, jonbiri, dholbiri, gaam- kharu, keru, Bana, and gal- pata. For more details click here.


West Bengal

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Bengali brides still use traditional heirloom ornaments for their weddings. Some of the unique pieces include Tairaa, Tikli, Chik, Paati haar etc… Read more about each of these ornaments here.


Bihar

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

The traditional wedding jewellery of Bihar also has tribal influences the bridal ornaments. Hasli or hansli is one such ornament which was traditionally handcrafted necklace which is made of silver or gold. Some have beads around it which could be changed according to the colour of the attire. Another necklace is chandanhar which also has coloured beads.


Gujarat

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Gujarati brides wear beautiful and large nose rings called nathnis. These nathnis are made of gold and are sometimes decorated with precious or semi-precious stones. They also wear wide bangles called bangadi and patlas. They also wear fancy waistbands called kandora.


Karnataka

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Like Andhra/Telangana the wedding jewellery of Karnataka also has temple influences. The famous of all is the netti chutti (to decorate the forehead). Unlike the regular mang tikkas a Karnataka bride's netri chutti will be adorned by traditional jewellery patterns with pearls and coloured stones, especially white, red and green. Tholu bandhi, which is used to adorn the upper arms are also a typical wedding jewellery of Kannada bride.


Kashmir

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Dejhoor is a traditional jewellery of Kashmir, but nowadays not many goldsmiths could recreate it. They are a long pair of gold earrings in a hexagonal shape with a dot in the centre of it and hang on thin gold threads known as atah. It is also worn by piercing the upper portion of the ear.

 

Kerala

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Kerala has not just one but many unique and special necklaces they are Kasu mala - which resembles gold coins, Mulla Mottu mala- like the jasmine buds, Palakka mala - a beautiful petal style traditional necklace that goes well with traditional outfits. Other special ornaments include Ilakkathali, manga mala (shaped like ripe mangoes), Nagapada Thaali, etc...

 

Maharashtra

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

The distinct bridal look of Maharashtrian brides is pearl encrusted nath, tanmani, vaaki (armlet), ambada (hair jewellery) Kolhapuri saaj etc are worn exclusively by Maharashtrian brides. Read more about Maharashtrian bridal looks here.

 

Rajasthan

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Borla - the famous mang tikka of Rajasthani brides is unique to the state. It is a sphere-shaped pendant that is attached to a gold string and embellished with precious or colourful stones. It is worn on the centre of the forehead across the partition of the hair. This particular ornament is also known as rakhdi. Rajasthani brides also love to wear large chokers called 'aad' which are studded with precious stones. The Rajput brides complete their look with a large rani haar (remember Aishwarya in Jodha Akbar). Heavy kundan and polki jewellery are also famous among Rajasthani brides.

 

Tamil Nadu

Indian-brides-diverse-ornament-collection-Jewellery-from-various-states

Like the rest of the South Indian brides, Tamil brides also wear temple designs on their ornaments. The unique sun and moon hair accessories give the Tamil brides a stunning look. They are basically encrusted in stones like emeralds or rubies. Along with it, they also wear mang tikkas similar to the Kannadiga brides. They also wear an ottiyanam (waistband) to add more elegance to their bridal look.

 

Picture courtesy: Google images







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